Dan Rushton

Variance

November 4 – 29, 2015

Press Release

Dan Rushton

 

Variance

 

EXHIBITION  November 4-29, 2015

OPENING  Thursday November 5, 6-8pm

 

Dutton is pleased to announce a solo exhibition by Brooklyn based artist Dan Rushton.

 

In this new group of large-scale process-oriented works, Rushton has used classical images of strong archetypal figures to continue his investigation into the line between free will and destiny, detached posturing, self-determination, and programmed behavior.

 

Rushton uses a mechanized form of painting that starts with a digital vector drawing, which is redrawn using a plotter that has been altered to hold large graffiti markers. The final image fuses the process lines used by the computer to get from point-to-point with the original drawing it is tracing, creating an infinite interplay of efficiency, chance, and gravity. Dual symbiotic relationships of maze and path become the tools used for painting. The accumulation of inky black lines and interplay between the human hand and digital technologies reflect on the mechanics behind our own experience and responses to the world. 

 

Dan Rushton was born in Nova Scotia and studied at Cooper Union and the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design where he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1996. He has lived in New York for eighteen years and his work has been shown in various solo and group shows across the US, Canada, and Europe, including a site-specific installation with Dutton, New York in 2015 and a solo show with Moti Hasson Gallery, New York, in 2007. Recent press includes a review of his show "Mazed" in Art Review and an article in Modern Painters Magazine entitled “Hacking the Plotter” – in an issue focusing on contemporary artists using innovative processes. His work is held in several private collections in the United States and Europe. Rushton lives and works in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

 

Wed-Sun 11-6pm and by appt

 

For further information and/or images, please email sonia@soniadutton.com or call 917 214 1838